A view of the ocean entry of a lava stream at Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, at sunset on January 29, 2017.
Photo: USGS

Kīlauea lava firehose

A view of the ocean entry of a lava stream at Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, at sunset on January 29, 2017. Photo: USGS

Aesthetical spectacle at Hawai’i’s most active volcano

February 5, 2017

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With excellent timing for the “Volcano Awareness Month on the Island of Hawaiʻi”, the Kīlauea volcano had a small breakout that began on January 22. Three days later, lava was flowing into the ocean at the Kamokuna ocean entry in form of a spectacular and remarkably steady “firehose” of 1 – 2 meters width.

When the molten lava hits the cool seawater, it reacts and causes explosions that throw large chunks of hot rock and debris inland. Footage captured by the USGS’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory  and shared by SciNews shows the lava stream in action:

According to theHawaiian Volcano Observatory, the “firehose” flow is now no longer visible. However, the entire zone of the ocean entry is unstable and the sea cliff Kamokuna ocean entry collapsed on February 2nd.

This map illustrates the more recent development of the East rift zone lava flow field of the volcano.

Follow the Geobuzz link to visit the website of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory by the US Geological Survey where you find lots of interesting information about the eruption and the volcanos on Hawai’i.

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